Things I Do and Don’t Hear (in Seattle)

In the category of “signs of mood affiliation” here is a short list of things I do and don’t hear in Seattle:

Do hear: “Who funded that study showing GMOs were safe?”
Don’t hear: “Who funded that study showing GMOs weren’t safe?”

Do hear: “We should be believe in climate change because nearly every major scientific organization (and many individual studies) have shown it’s real and a serious problem.”
Don’t hear: “We should believe in the efficacy of GMOs because nearly every major scientific organization (and many individual studies) have shown both their safety and benefits.”

Do hear: “Are you aware of the methodological and measurement problems of GDP?”
Don’t hear: “Are you aware of the methodological and measurement problems of the inequality data?”
Don’t hear: GDP isn’t perfect, but it correlates with nearly everything else we do care about and so as a single measure it’s not bad.

Do hear: “That scathing op-ed in the New York Times by the ex-Wall Street executive really hit the nail on the head.”
Don’t hear: “That scathing op-ed in the New York Times by the ex-Wall Street executive was an ‘n’ of 1. Hundreds of thousands of people work on Wall Street, surely some of them find the work challenging and rewarding.”
Do hear: “That interview with the Iraqi teenager who supported America’s invasion was an ‘n’ of 1. Surely, there are many other contrary opinions among Iraqis.”

Do hear: “You can’t trust the corporate billionaire’s position on tax reform, she’s totally biased!”
Don’t hear:
“You can’t trust the social justice activist who’s entire identity is wrapped up in opposing corporations writ large, she’s totally biased.”

Do hear: “We need to learn from and honor the traditional practices of the Tanzanian farmer.”
Don’t hear: “We need to learn from and honor the scientific techniques of the modern American farmer.”

Do hear: “Justice Antonin Scalia was a horrible person. His interpretation of the law is crazy. He’s allowing corporations to take over elections because he subscribes to corporate personhood.”
Don’t hear: “I’ve actually read Citizen’s United or any other judicial opinion/concurrence/dissent from Scalia.”
Also hear: “Why are you even quoting the bible if you haven’t read the whole thing cover to cover? Why don’t you read something before forming an opinion.”

Do hear: “Justice Antonin Scalia was a horrible person. His interpretation of the law is crazy. He’s allowing corporations to take over elections because he subscribes to corporate personhood.”
Rarely hear: “I have any knowledge at all of the law or legal history.”
Don’t hear: “I’m aware that most of the econometric work on elections shows that spending has little effect on election outcomes and since the Citizen’s United decision campaign spending has actually gone down.”

Do hear: “Supreme court justices on the right are obviously biased about gay marriage and should recuse themselves.”
Don’t hear: “Ruth Bader Ginsburg presided over a same-sex wedding and should recuse herself in gay marriage cases.”

Will probably hear: The person that wrote this post is obviously a republican and pro corporation/Monsanto/a bunch of other stuff and anti same-sex marriage/equality/a bunch of other stuff.
Will probably not hear: The person that wrote this post has views that do not comport with either political party, but as he lives in Seattle he tends to hear more liberal hypocrisy than conservative hypocrisy, of which there is undoubtedly mounds.

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